Now showing 1 - 8 of 8
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Investigation of The Psychological Wellbeing after a One-Week-Skiing Intervention with Childhood Cancer Survivors
    (2023) ;
    Lampe, Viktoria 
    ;
    Zimmermann, Tanja 
    After a child’s cancer diagnosis, the life of the whole family changes immediately. Besides physical exposure due to both the disease and the treatment, psychological stress, anxiety and uncertainties arise for all family members. In a family-oriented winter sport rehabilitation camp in the alps the increased physical fitness should be focused besides the adventure and the psychological wellbeing, thus basically the path back to normality. In order to investigate the latter, the parents of eight patients (10.87 yrs. ± 5.33 yrs.) were surveyed before and after the journey via the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) consisting of 25 items divided into five subscales (social behavior, hyperactivity, emotional problems, problems with peer groups, behavioral problems). It was pointed out that for the given setting open answer options were more meaningful than closed answers. There was only one significance for the subscale behavioral problems. However, the parents stated distinctly positive effects regarding the social togetherness of the children, the atmosphere within the families, the independence and self- confidence of the children. According to the participants the rehabilitation journey could be recommended not only for the improvement of motor parameters and physical effects, but also on a psychological level and for an increased perceived health-related life quality
      33  69
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Sport und Gesundheit. Bewegungswissenschaftliche Grundlagen für innovative Gesundheitssportkonzepte
    (Universitätsverlag Hildesheim, 2022) ;
    Universität Hildesheim
    This manuscript will explain various programmes and innovative concepts for sports and physical activity and additionally show selected scientific studies and the respective results. It is necessary to evaluate these concepts in order to be able to conscientiously implement them for therapy activities in the future. The underlying investigations are intentionally diverse and heterogenous, just as my research profile. Therefore I investigate the optimization of sports-related therapies in malignant diseases (with an emphasis on pediatric oncology). Thereby both scopes motion science and health play an important role regarding research and subsequent implementation for physical activity-related therapies. The studies are about comparatively straight forward training concepts that can be instructed and performed in the training wards of hospitals and rehabilitation facilities (block 1: training science). On the other hand it is about biomechanical and motion science experiments of selected health-related parameters (block 2: biomechanics and motion science). This is to evaluate both the teaching concept and the utilized equipment for block 3 and to optimize it in the sense of a health-specific, goal-oriented and sustainable approach to rehabilitation. Moreover, alpine skiing will be investigated as a rehabilitation activity in block 3 (block 3: clinic and immunological aspects). The direct link of motion science and health sports should firstly become apparent in this context from a motion scientific point of view. Subsequently this link should become more illustrated via the mentioned heterogenous studies all of which follow the same aim: to implement and establish innovative sports-, movement- and health concepts for training therapies on an empirical basis.
      42  1078
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Der direkte Weg zum parallelen Skifahren
    (Philippka-Sportverlag, 2021) ;
    Eden, Nils 
      4
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A biomechanical field testing approach in snow sports: Case studies toward a detailed analysis of joint loading
    (2020) ;
    McAlpine, Paul 
    ;
    Kersting, Uwe G. 
    In this study, kinematic and kinetic measurements were combined to assess the effects of removing the stiff shaft from a ski boot. It was hypothesized that joint flexion at the ankle, knee and hip increase and reduce joint loading specifically at the knee. A previously developed force sensor was combined with a high-speed camera system for data collection of 6 degrees of freedom ground reaction forces and three-dimensional marker data in the field on a wave slope. The collected data were used as input to a musculoskeletal model for the estimation of joint kinematics and joint moments and contact forces in the ankle and knee. The force sensor, which was previously used for skiing, had experienced wear and tear and was thus prone to breakage. As a result, joint loading could only be analyzed for two skiers. These two skiers did not use the added range of ankle flexion to its full extent, but showed substantial reductions in joint moments and joint contact forces (e.g. knee compression force from 85 to 57 N/kg). Only one of the five experienced skiers tested was able to adopt the anticipated movement pattern by substantially increased maximum ankle joint flexion angle (from 10° to 37°) and knee joint flexion angle (from 93° to 105°) and the respective ranges of motion when skiing through a wave course. The study provides information on possible individual adaptations to ski boot modifications. The mechanical construction of the force sensor will need to be modified to withstand the high forces expected during freestyle skiing. The study also supports the future use of this measurement setup for comprehensive studies in snow sports, provided that a sufficient training period is given.
      7  49
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Application of Inertial Motion Unit-Based Kinematics to Assess the Effect of Boot Modifications on Ski Jump Landings-A Methodological Study
    (2020) ;
    Petrone, Nicola 
    ;
    Supej, Matej 
    ;
    Wisser, Anna 
    ;
    Hansen, Jakob 
    ;
    Kersting, Uwe 
    Biomechanical studies of winter sports are challenging due to environmental conditions which cannot be mimicked in a laboratory. In this study, a methodological approach was developed merging 2D video recordings with sensor-based motion capture to investigate ski jump landings. A reference measurement was carried out in a laboratory, and subsequently, the method was exemplified in a field study by assessing the effect of a ski boot modification on landing kinematics. Landings of four expert skiers were filmed under field conditions in the jump plane, and full body kinematics were measured with an inertial motion unit (IMU) -based motion capture suit. This exemplary study revealed that the combination of video and IMU data is viable. However, only one skier was able to make use of the added boot flexibility, likely due to an extended training time with the modified boot. In this case, maximum knee flexion changed by 36° and maximum ankle flexion by 13°, whereas the other three skiers changed only marginally. The results confirm that 2D video merged with IMU data are suitable for jump analyses in winter sports, and that the modified boot will allow for alterations in landing technique provided that enough time for training is given.
      5
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Long-term outcome of arthroscopic debridement of massive irreparable rotator cuff tears
    (2020)
    Vogler, Tim 
    ;
    Andreou, Dimosthenis 
    ;
    Gosheger, Georg 
    ;
    ;
    Velmans, Clara 
    ;
    Ameziane, Yacine 
    ;
    Schneider, Kristian 
    ;
    Rickert, Carolin 
    ;
    Liem, Dennis 
    ;
    Schorn, Dominik 
    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcome of low-demand patients with massive rotator cuff tears undergoing arthroscopic debridement in mid- and long-term follow-up, as well as the rate of conversion to reverse shoulder arthroplasty. METHODS We performed a retrospective analysis of 19 patients with a mean age at surgery of 68 years (range, 55-80 years) from a previously described consecutive cohort and after a mean follow up of 47 month (FU1) and 145 month (FU2). The functional outcome was evaluated with the VAS score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and the age- and gender-adjusted Constant (aCS) score. The radiographic outcome was classified according to the Hamada classification. Non-parametric analyses were carried out with the Mann-Whitney U for independent samples and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for related samples. RESULTS Five patients (26%) developed symptomatic cuff tear arthropathy and underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty after a mean time of 63 months (range, 45-97 months). These patients were excluded from further analyses. The mean VAS score of the remaining 14 patients at FU1 was significantly lower compared to preoperatively (P = .041), while there were no significant differences between the VAS score at FU1 and FU2 (P = 1.0). The ASES score of the affected shoulder at FU1 was significantly higher compared to prior to surgery (P = .028), while there were no significant differences between the scores of the affected shoulder between FU1 and FU2 (P = .878). While the ASES score of the contralateral shoulder at FU1 was significantly higher than the score of the affected shoulder (P = .038), there were no significant differences in the ASES scores of the affected and the healthy shoulder at FU2 (P = .575). The evaluation of the aCS produced similar results. A progression of the Hamada grade was documented in 6 patients. CONCLUSIONS Arthroscopic debridement is a safe and valid option for low-demand middle-age or elderly patients with symptomatic massive rotator cuff tears, leading to a significant pain relief and significantly improved functional outcome at mid- and long-term follow up. However, about a quarter of the patients in our cohort had to undergo reverse shoulder arthroplasty due to symptomatic cuff tear arthropathy. Furthermore, some of the remaining patients continued to undergo radiographic progression. This might be due to the natural history of their disease and/or the surgical procedure, and the clinical relevance of this finding should be evaluated in further studies.
      4
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Applications, indications, and effects of passive hydrotherapy WATSU (WaterShiatsu)
    (2020)
    Schitter, Agnes 
    ;
    Fleckenstein, Johannes 
    ;
    ;
    Taeymans, Jan 
    ;
    ;
    Radlinger, Lorenz 
    BACKGROUND WATSU (portmanteau word: water and shiatsu) is a form of passive hydrotherapy in chest-deep thermoneutral water (35°C = 95°F = 308.15 K). It combines elements of myofascial stretching, joint mobilization, massage, and shiatsu and is reported to be used to address physical and mental issues. The objective of this systematic review (PROSPERO Registration No. CRD42016029347) and the meta-analyses was to assess the applications, indications, and the effects of WATSU to form a basis for further studies. METHODS A search for "WATSU OR watershiatsu OR (water AND shiatsu)" was conducted without any restrictions in 32 databases. Peer reviewed original articles addressing WATSU as a stand-alone hydrotherapy were assessed for risk of bias. Quantitative data of effects on pain, physical function, and mental issues were processed in random model meta-analyses with subgroup analyses by study design. Effect sizes were expressed as Hedges's g (± 95% confidence intervals). RESULTS Of 1,906 unique citations, 27 articles regardless of study design were assessed for risk of bias. WATSU has been applied to individuals of all ages. Indications covered acute (e.g. pregnancy related low back pain) and chronic conditions (e.g. cerebral palsy) with beneficial effects of WATSU regarding e.g. relaxation or sleep quality. Meta-analyses suggest beneficial effect sizes of WATSU on pain (overall Hedges's g = -0.71, 95% CI = -0.91 to -0.51), physical function (overall Hedges's g = -0.76, 95% CI = -1.08 to -0.44), and mental issues (overall Hedges's g = -0.68, 95% CI = -1.02 to -0.35). CONCLUSION Various applications, indications and beneficial effects of WATSU were identified. The grade of this evidence is estimated to be low to moderate at the best. To strengthen the findings of this study, high-quality RCTs are needed.
      6
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Kinder in Bewegung
    (Meyer & Meyer Verlag, 2020)
    Gerfen, Peter 
    ;
    ;
    Hoffmann, Brinja 
      4